vegan-queer:

bebinn:

recoverykitty:

FYI Amazon now sells Plan B emergency contraceptive

This is half or even less the price you’d probably find it in a pharmacy! It’s a really good idea to have it on hand, so you can take it right away if you need to. If your sexual activities put you at risk for unintended pregnancy, consider keeping this in your medicine cabinet!

Have it on hand for you or a friend or a sibling or anyone. Be someone’s go-to.

(via astrofemme)

rainekitty:

medschool-thenbabies:

Telling your son not to “be such a girl” lets his sister who overhears the conversation know that being a girl is not a good thing and she should be sorry and ashamed of herself.

It also reminds your son that being a boy is better than being a girl and therefore he is better than any girl he will ever meet.

In russian if you cry you get called a cabbage. Vote to change “dont be such a girl to “dont be such a cabbage” say I.

(via saimasmileslike)

freedominwickedness:

sparkamovement:

Olympics struggle with ‘policing femininity’: 

There are female athletes who will be competing at the Olympic Games this summer after undergoing treatment to make them less masculine.
Still others are being secretly investigated for displaying overly manly characteristics, as sport’s highest medical officials attempt to quantify — and regulate — the hormonal difference between male and female athletes.
Caster Semenya, the South African runner who was so fast and muscular that many suspected she was a man, exploded onto the front pages three years ago. She was considered an outlier, a one-time anomaly.
But similar cases are emerging all over the world, and Semenya, who was banned from competition for 11 months while authorities investigated her sex, is back, vying for gold.
Semenya and other women like her face a complex question: Does a female athlete whose body naturally produces unusually high levels of male hormones, allowing them to put on more muscle mass and recover faster, have an “unfair” advantage?
In a move critics call “policing femininity,” recent rule changes by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the governing body of track and field, state that for a woman to compete, her testosterone must not exceed the male threshold.
If it does, she must have surgery or receive hormone therapy prescribed by an expert IAAF medical panel and submit to regular monitoring. So far, at least a handful of athletes — the figure is confidential — have been prescribed treatment, but their numbers could increase. Last month, the International Olympic Committee began the approval process to adopt similar rules for the Games.

There’s a lot going on here, but here’s what jumped out at us immediately: Women, particularly women athletes, are constantly told they’re not as strong or fast as men—and now that they’re proving otherwise, they’re being forced to undergo hormone treatments. We don’t think it’s a coincidence that women of color are coming under fire for this more than white women. From the article: “Lindsay Perry, another scientist, says sometimes whole teams of African women are dead ringers for men.” This is a clear example of how we’ve constructed a very particular, very narrow ideal of femininity and womanhood that devalues and casts aside black women in particular. 

We also see continued use of the high school level oversimplification that testosterone is a “male hormone”, when the reality is that even if you set aside trans and intersex people as special cases, the vast majority of all human beings produce testosterone. The cutoff ranges for what constitute “male” and “female” testosterone ranges are completely arbitrary, and are — surprise surprise — based on statistical averages for white cis women.

freedominwickedness:

sparkamovement:

Olympics struggle with ‘policing femininity’: 

There are female athletes who will be competing at the Olympic Games this summer after undergoing treatment to make them less masculine.

Still others are being secretly investigated for displaying overly manly characteristics, as sport’s highest medical officials attempt to quantify — and regulate — the hormonal difference between male and female athletes.

Caster Semenya, the South African runner who was so fast and muscular that many suspected she was a man, exploded onto the front pages three years ago. She was considered an outlier, a one-time anomaly.

But similar cases are emerging all over the world, and Semenya, who was banned from competition for 11 months while authorities investigated her sex, is back, vying for gold.

Semenya and other women like her face a complex question: Does a female athlete whose body naturally produces unusually high levels of male hormones, allowing them to put on more muscle mass and recover faster, have an “unfair” advantage?

In a move critics call “policing femininity,” recent rule changes by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the governing body of track and field, state that for a woman to compete, her testosterone must not exceed the male threshold.

If it does, she must have surgery or receive hormone therapy prescribed by an expert IAAF medical panel and submit to regular monitoring. So far, at least a handful of athletes — the figure is confidential — have been prescribed treatment, but their numbers could increase. Last month, the International Olympic Committee began the approval process to adopt similar rules for the Games.

There’s a lot going on here, but here’s what jumped out at us immediately: Women, particularly women athletes, are constantly told they’re not as strong or fast as men—and now that they’re proving otherwise, they’re being forced to undergo hormone treatments. We don’t think it’s a coincidence that women of color are coming under fire for this more than white women. From the article: “Lindsay Perry, another scientist, says sometimes whole teams of African women are dead ringers for men.” This is a clear example of how we’ve constructed a very particular, very narrow ideal of femininity and womanhood that devalues and casts aside black women in particular. 

We also see continued use of the high school level oversimplification that testosterone is a “male hormone”, when the reality is that even if you set aside trans and intersex people as special cases, the vast majority of all human beings produce testosterone. The cutoff ranges for what constitute “male” and “female” testosterone ranges are completely arbitrary, and are — surprise surprise — based on statistical averages for white cis women.

(via astrofemme)

bobbycaputo:

Geotagged Wildlife Photos Help Poachers Kill Endangered Animals

If you care about endangered animals that are hunted for their parts, here’s something important you should keep in mind: make sure you scrub the GPS data on the images prior to sharing them online. Poachers have reportedly been turning to geotagged photos on social networks in order to find out where they can make their next kill.

A photograph that has recently been making the rounds on the Web shows a sign that has been put up at an undisclosed reserve. It reads:

Please be careful when sharing photos on social media. They can lead poachers to our rhino

Turn off geotag function and do not disclose where the photo was taken

(Continue Reading)

(via owning-my-truth)

neshatriumphs:

homozexual:

Esther Quek

The badass boss that redefines androgyny.

SO ON POINT IT KILLS ME

Good Lawd…

(Source: mariefatale, via theroadtofashionhell)

Professors Love Answering Cold Emails from White Dudes, "Meh" on Everyone Else

twssonline:

jhameia:

sarahjhuynh:

writeswrongs:

Two more kickers: “There’s absolutely no benefit seen when women reach out to female faculty, nor do we see benefits from black students reaching out to black faculty or Hispanic students reaching out to Hispanic faculty,” and, “In business academia, we see a 25 percentage point gap in the response rate to Caucasian males vs. women and minorities.” Word, this sounds great, we’re doing great. [NPR]

But white male privilege doesn’t exist?

And then there’s this:

Milkman found there were very large disparities between academic departments and between schools. Faculty at private schools were significantly more likely to discriminate against women and minorities than faculty at public schools. And faculty in fields that were very lucrative were also more likely to discriminate. So there was very little discrimination in the humanities. There was more discrimination among faculty at the natural sciences. And there was a lot of discrimination among the faculty at business schools.

Uh-huh tell me again how science and money are ideologically neutral.

Wowza.

(via owning-my-truth)

// HEY PLUS SIZE FOLK, AND FRIENDS OF PLUS SIZE FOLK. WE NEED YOUR HELP.//

animegirlrunningwithtoast:

YOU KNOW HOW OUR CLOTHING OPTIONS SUCK.

WELL LOOK AT THIS.

THIS IS FAT TAX, AN INDIE GOGO COMPAIGN TO MAKE AFFORDABLE PLUS SIZE WEAR 

YOU HEARD ME. AFFORDABLE. PLUS SIZE. WEAR. 

BUT THEY NEED YOUR HELP. 

IT NEEDS 5000$ GET UP AND RUNNING AND IT’S ONLY 620$

PLEASE DONATE IF YOU CAN, AND IF NOT SIGNAL BOOST IT.

DO IT FOR ALL THE PLUS SIZE PEEPS WHO JUST WANNA LOOK CUTE TOO. 

(via theroadtofashionhell)

riverknowshisname:

As someone with epilepsy this is an important message to share. Thank you bloggers for the heads up.

(Source: peetasallhehasleft, via masterofidols)

My brain has created, without my permission, a perfect replica of what it would sound like if the tribute to Lil’ Sebastian song written by Andy Dwyer on Parks and Rec was covered by the Avett Brothers, including a repeating banjo lick, and yell/singing. My brain has also decided, without my permission, to play this on repeat.

I'm pretty good at existing.